Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

This Cheese Festival Ran Out of Cheese and People Are Really Upset

This Cheese Festival Ran Out of Cheese and People Are Really Upset



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The organizers of a festival in the U.K. Ticket buyers for The Big Cheese Festival took to social media to express their disdain over an alleged lack of cheese, saying the March 3 celebration was “rubbish” and “a joke” and claiming that there was “just mud and no cheese.”

Corrinne Lowry, who traveled several hours from Essex to Brighton, says her husband paid £25 ($35) each for their admission. The event, which guaranteed “a plethora of the finest international cheesemakers and mongers showcasing their amazing cheeses," was initially set to take place at a racecourse but was relocated to Hove Lawns — a large grassy space by the sea that Lowry describes as a “mud bath.”

“There were only three stalls selling cheese and four selling hot cheese-related food,” she told The Daily Meal. “Far from adequate for a cheese festival. There were other stalls selling other things but the fact that these outnumbered the cheese stalls was ridiculous.”

So Lowry and her husband sat in the entertainment marquee, where she hoped to find performances or cooking demonstrations on theme with the event but instead found “just a bad disco.” Disappointed, the couple left within an hour of arriving.

Lowry has asked for compensation but says she has not heard back yet.

Event administrators are saying that the “larger variety of cheese” consumers were promised never showed because vendors ran into tricky weather conditions and “impassible roads” on their journey to the space. Storm Emma, which just rolled through the region, left much of the U.K. covered in heaps of snow and ice.

“Despite this, our cheese traders who were able to attend showed amazing dedication throughout the event, and did not fail to deliver, with food available right to the end,” organizers wrote on Facebook, adding that they were “just as disappointed” with the incident as eventgoers.

Although droves of customers have asked for a refund, they are currently only being offered a 50 percent discount to next year’s event. The Big Cheese Festival’s Facebook page says people have until March 15 to submit complaints or feedback to [email protected]

The Daily Meal has reached out to The Big Cheese Festival for further comment.

But this isn’t the first time an event like this has gone haywire. In December, Britain’s Giant Cheeseboard festival was nicknamed the “Fyre Festival of the U.K.” after photos emerged showing people standing in endless lines for “dry crackers, cubes of cheddar and watered down mulled wine.” The actual Fyre Festival was slated to be a posh music event that promised luxury villas and gourmet meals on a tropical island. Guests stayed in tents and ate prepackaged sandwiches instead.

For more PR disasters, check out these 10 times Applebee’s, Fridays, and 7 other chains really messed up.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


The Rock-and-Roll Cheesemaker: A Q&A With Blur's Alex James

After Britpop superstars Blur first split up in the early 2000s, bassist Alex James got married and moved to a farm in the British countryside𠅊nd then he started making cheese. Now, James is more involved in fermented milk than he is in music: He writes newspaper columns in the UK about food, and in August he is curating a music and food festival with Jamie Oliver called The Big Feastival, which will be held on James’s 200-acre farm. Unfortunately, his three artisanal cheeses—Little Whallop (goat cheese washed in brandy and wrapped in a vine leaf), Goddess (a rich, semi-soft cows&apos milk cheese), and Farleigh Whallop (a goat cheese log rolled in thyme)𠅊re unavailable in the US. This spring James is back on tour with Blur for a handful of big festival shows, including Coachella. Just a few hours before going onstage, James sat down with blogger Zach Brooks to talk farming, Sting’s olive oil and cheese. A portion of the interview is below to download their entire talk, head to foodisthenewrock.com.

What&aposs it like having a farm in the Cotswolds?
Buying a farm is like running a small bankrupt country. It’s not just a house𠅊 farm—it’s a business. It’s not grand. It has to work. We’ve got a couple of hundred acres and the first two years was like: Hedges, what are you supposed to do with hedges? And drains, and ditches, and there’s water going everywhere, and things are breaking and falling over and running away. And suddenly I found I was getting up earlier than I ever had. But I absolutely loved it. And I’ve always loved cheese, and it took two years to figure out that’s what we should be making on the farm.

When did you get the farm?
Ten years ago. I think farms probably are the natural habitat for the aging rock gentleman. It’s hard to think of somebody in a serious band who doesn’t live on a farm. Roger Daltrey lives on a farm. Paul McCartney lives on a farm. Sting lives on a farm. I tell you what: Sting’s olive oil is the benchmark celebrity food product. It’s absolutely knockout.

Can people buy Sting’s olive oil? Or do you trade it: “I’ll trade you a block of my blue cheese for a bottle of your olive oil”?
There’s a really limited amount. I’ve seen it only once. If you’re listening, Sting, I’m well up for some swapsies.

So how did the cheese thing happen?
I suddenly went from having a balcony as my outside space to being suddenly the ruler of this tiny kingdom that had stuff living in it and growing in it. I was just sort of gradually getting to grips with it all when somebody approached me saying, “I’m a cheesemaker,” and he wanted somewhere to make cheese. And I was like, “Really!” Because people used to throw cheese me at me when Blur was playing and would present it to me in hotel lobbies. It was sort of the one-word thing you used to describe me. Cheese is incredibly tasty stuff. Milk is such a mammalian elixir, isn’t it? And cheese is the ultimate distillation of milk. I do absolutely love cheese. In terms of running a business it would much better if I loved wine, beer, or coffee or something where the profit margins are much higher.

So how important is the quality of the milk vs. the process?
You can make an OK cheese out of OK milk. And you can make an OK cheese out of great milk. But you can’t make a great cheese out of OK milk. If you made a cheese with Guernsey milk instead of Holstein milk you𠆝 get a much denser, creamier cheese. The rarest cheese in the world is reindeer cheese. They’re very hard to catch, and they don’t like being milked.

Do you have a desert island cheese?
A really good, mature, really hard artisan cheddar would probably be my desert island cheese, with pickled onion and a bit of pineapple. But the one I’m really excited at the moment is aged Gouda. But I think it sort of changes all the time. It depends on what time of day it is as well. Blue cheese, not a breakfast thing. But when it gets dark. it’s a good way to end the day, with a really smelly cheese before you go to bed.

Do you have favorite cheeses around the world?
My passion was definitely developed and informed and nurtured by touring with the band because we𠆝 get cheese on the rider. It would just say 𠇌heese,” so in France where cheese is called fromage, fromage doesn’t mean cheddar. Cheese means cheddar in Britain. If you say cheese, people will think cheddar. If you say fromage in France, that means Camembert probably. And formaggio in Italy, that means maybe Parmesan, maybe mozzarella. Queso in Spain means Manchego probably, which is made from sheep milk, hard cheese, really nutty, sweet, amazing. And it goes on and on all around the world.

What do you think of Kraft American cheese slices?
I’m a big fan of a bit of melty cheese on a burger. I’m not snobby about it.


Watch the video: CHEESE FESTIVAL (August 2022).